The Education Secretary’s Comments

Have you seen the articles written in regards to the Education Secretary, John B. King’s comments about homeschooling in the U.S.?

Here are a couple of articles that I found interesting.

“U.S. Education Secretary Says He Is Concerned About Homeschooled Kids” from Caffeinated Thoughts

“What Obama’s Education Secretary Got Wrong About Homeschoolers” from The Daily Signal

I have some serious thoughts about it myself, but I’ll only comment on the one line that stood out to me most. This one, “King said he worries that ‘students who are homeschooled are not getting kind of the rapid instructional experience they would get in school’—unless parents are “very intentional about it”.”

I believe most of us have left the education system because we did not desire the “rapid instructional experience”. Real, whole-life learning and education is not rapid or instructional. Relating real education with school is holding so many citizens of this country back from greatness. Homeschool families are very intentional about giving their children all the advantages of a personalized education that no government school can create.

I highly recommend the two articles above and remind everyone that homeschooling remaining a legal option in the United States is not guaranteed. We all need to remain vigilant and support those groups that help us navigate the government waters and keep our rights secure.

Latin?

Does anyone still learn Latin? I was surprised when my then thirteen-year-old asked me about learning Latin. He thought it looked like it would help him understand English better. I think he read somewhere that it would be a good place to start learning other languages. He really enjoyed the program we got because it wasn’t just learning the words. It had a lot of history along with it.

We bought the online version that you could print the pages you needed as you went along and really enjoyed that. My son was always overwhelmed at the sight of a large book of print when he was younger. He knew he didn’t need to complete it. And he knew that it was up to him how long he wanted to stick with it, but he having the book there in his sight made him feel anxious. He didn’t even like coloring books when he was younger because he felt compelled to complete them even though he didn’t really like coloring. I’m happy to report he grew out of that. He’s almost sixteen now has large books sitting on his nightstand that he reads a bit from every night. And he is perfectly capable of taking apart a big project and doing a little at time. But I digress! I was able to print out a couple pages at a time this way and it gave him a chance to practice writing a bit as well.

The program we used was called Lively Latin. The author of the program was a homeschooler herself. I met her once at a homeschool conference after my son had been using her program for about a year. She was so friendly, one of those people you feel like you already know when you meet them.

Here are some articles about why you should, or should not learn Latin. Do some research and decide for yourselves. I know we had a great time learning it together! It’s come in handy learning other languages and at museums. And it’s entertaining to harass each other about using Latin words in games like Scrabble!

7 Reasons Why I’m Learning Latin And Teaching My Kids Too

Don’t Study Latin

Kissing the frog: Our Latin Curriculum Hunt and What I Learned

Thoughts on an Article About ADHD

“When we can’t say ‘No,’ we become a sponge for the feelings of everyone around us and we eventually become saturated by the needs of everyone else while our own hearts wilt and die. We begin to live our lives according to the forceful should of others, rather than the whispered, passionate want of our own hearts. We let everyone else tell us what story to live and we cease to be the author of our own lives. We lose our voice — we lose the desire planted in our souls and the very unique way in which we might live out that desire in the world. We get used by the world instead of being useful in the world.” – Dr. Kelly M. Flanagan, a licensed clinical psychologist, Ph.D. in clinical psychology (source)

The article is called “4 Facts About ADHD That Teachers & Doctors Never Tell Parents.”

Please read the article. He isn’t saying ADHD does not exist or that it should be disregarded and neither am I.

It’s all very familiar to veteran homeschooling parents, especially ones that had their kids in the public school system but left because they realized that it didn’t fit for their family. I’ve talked with many families that have found a completely different child once they were removed from school, much like the kid they knew before school or during the summer.

My question is this, why do we treat children so different than adults? I’m not talking about expectations of caring for themselves or taking on the responsibilities of adult like. I’m talking about personal rights. Why do we not respect their “no”? Why do we force them to “share”? How can we expect them to grow and respect others when they themselves are treated as second-class citizens?

If I’m sitting at an Italian opera and I’m yawning, fidgeting, and thinking about what I will do tomorrow or what it would be like to repaint the room, my partner doesn’t think I have a disorder that is obviously impairing my ability to absorb the important art form I’m witnessing. He thinks I’m bored. He believes I’m completely uninterested and decides to take me on a date somewhere else next time, not drug me so that I can better enjoy his interest. Is a child in a classroom any different? Find a new venue, explore other topics, find that child’s spark and build on it! He isn’t like you. He isn’t ready for figures and history. He wants adventure, art, or activity. Why can’t we embrace that and find out what kind of an adult that child becomes instead of forming him by force into the adult we want him to be.